.45 CARRY GLOCKS

.45 Carry Glocks: Five models in several configurations for those who favor concealing big bores!

Soon after Glock’s foray into the American market, the company learned that the diverse needs of the shooting public would be tough to satisfy. Initial demand for Glocks in .45 would shift to the demand for something smaller and more concealable, something thinner and something better suited for the smallest hands. In time, Glock would more than satisfy each of those requests. Steve Woods Photos

When Glock introduced the revolutionary Glock17 9mm pistol in the early 1980s, the company learned that the American market would be tough to satisfy. This is a John Wayne kind of country, and when the first demand from the US market was, “We want one of these in .45,” the company listened.

In 1990, I went to Smyrna, Georgia, to tour the Glock plant and become certified as both an armorer and an instructor under company auspices. While there, I got to handle one of the first Glock 21 pistols chambered for .45 ACP. Then and now, the G21 was built to hold 13 big .45 ACP cartridges in its double-stack magazine and a fourteenth in its firing chamber. Like its virtual twin—the Glock 20 in 10mm, which preceded it by a very short timeframe—the G21 was in essence the standard service-size Glock, scaled up to take a wider and longer cartridge.

Soon, demand would continue for other .45 ACPs from Glock, something smaller and more concealable, something thinner, something better suited for the smallest hands. In time, Glock would work to satisfy each of those requests.

glock30
The Glock 30 was the first compact .45 produced by the Austrian armsmaker and remains hugely popular. Essentially a “chopped and channeled” G21, the G30 is designed around a 10-shot mag, with an eleventh in the chamber. Steve Woods Photo

Glock 30
In the field for well over a decade now, the Glock 30 was the first compact .45 ACP produced by Glock and remains hugely popular. Essentially a “chopped and channeled” G21, the G30 is designed around a 10-round magazine, with an 11th in the chamber. The floorplate on the 10-round magazine extends low enough to allow the bottom finger a good hold. Glock has manufactured a shorter, flatter-bottomed 9-round magazine for those who require even greater concealment potential. Carried on the body, the G30 feels (and conceals) about like a G19. It is very slightly thicker through the frame, but this tends to go unnoticed in daily carry. Many G30 users carry their spare ammunition in 13-round G21 magazines.

Recoil is remarkably soft for such a lightweight pistol in .45 ACP. The G30 is extremely reliable with virtually every brass-case service load in its caliber. The G30 has proven to be the most accurate of large-bore Glocks, despite its short barrel and sight radius. The reason appears to be the combination of a proportionally very thick and rigid barrel and slide, and the double captive recoil spring system that Glock uses in its subcompact pistols. The latter apparently holds the slide very consistently in battery until the bullet has left the muzzle, before unlocking begins and the barrel begins to tilt during the automatic ejection/feed cycle that follows.

This writer has twice shot 5-round groups under 1-inch at 25 yards with the G30, once with Federal 230-grain Hydra-Shok ammunition and once with 185-grain Remington Match. Groups of 1.5 inches or less are reported with great frequency. Plan on 200 to 300 rounds of break-in fire before that level of accuracy presents itself, though reliability seems to be built-in from the first shot.

glock-sf30_detail_5
Due to the combination of a proportionally thick and rigid barrel and slide, and the double captive recoil spring system that Glock uses in its subcompact pistols, the G30 has proven to be the most accurate of largebore Glocks despite its short barrel and sight radius.

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