Army taking inventory of vehicles it needs down the road.

U.S. Sailors drive a mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicle during an individual…

U.S. Sailors drive a mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicle during an individual augmentee combat training course at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J., April 24, 2011. The four-week course prepared Sailors for deployments to support contingency operations in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kuwait and the Horn of Africa. (U.S. Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Chandler/Released)

The Army is taking stock of its vehicle fleet, an analysis that will, among other things, give the service a better sense as to what it should do with the roughly 20,000 heavily armored MRAPS on the books, according to Defense News.

The need for MRAPS, short for mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles, is far less today than it was a few years ago, when U.S. servicemembers were fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan and roadside bomb attacks were epidemic.

U.S. forces left Iraq in late 2011, and current plans call for U.S. and NATO forces to ceded more and more of their duties in Afghanistan to indigenous forces this year and next.

Source: Stripes.com

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