BATTLE RATTLER

Geissele’s Super Semi-Automatic two-stage trigger is crisp and predictable. The…

Geissele’s Super Semi-Automatic two-stage trigger is crisp and predictable. The triggerguard allows for gloved hands.

A gladius bordered by a laurel wreath is the mark of Legion Firearms, a company based in Temple, Texas, that has succeeded in projecting the strength and precision of history’s Roman Legions into an AR-15 platform. Coated almost entirely in nickel-boron, which allows it to run in the harshest conditions, Legion’s LF-15C is built for the battlefield.

A direct impingement weapon chambered for 5.56mm NATO, the LF-15C was designed to exceed mil-spec standards and offer full ambidextrous control. Its upper receiver is a monolithic billet design made of 7075-T6 aircraft-grade aluminum alloy and fitted with a handguard that features tapped holes for the attachment of modular Mil-Std-1913 rail panels, which reduces weight where rails are unnecessary and provides relief to the support hand.

legion_battlecomp_8970
The Battlecomp 2.0 has the same dimensions as an A2 flash suppressor, so it integrates with suppressor attachments.

The 16-inch barrel is made of 416 stainless steel and has arc-shaped rifling, a rarity for a U.S. manufacturer, that decreases wear on the bore and increases muzzle velocity to optimize ammunition performance. Special external contouring along the barrel, forward of the gas block, is created using hex fluting and enhances balance by reducing weight and adding rigidity. This also increases heat dissipation over a greater surface area. Also made of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy, the lower receiver features a fully ambidextrous bolt release on each side of the weapon, a significant improvement over aftermarket levers that can crowd the trigger. The bolt carrier group is shot-peened #58 Carpenter steel with a mil-spec gas key, a chrome-silicon extractor spring, and Viton plunger and O-ring. A lubricious WMD NiB-X nickel-boron coating protects the upper and lower receivers and the bolt carrier group, making oil practically unnecessary and limiting the maintenance needed. You merely wipe clean any dirt and debris. An additional ceramic topcoat is also applied to protect the receivers. The company claims that over 3,000 rounds were successfully fired through a prototype in testing without cleaning, with lubrication applied only to the gas rings and action spring.

3vu1j9714ok-copy-copy
Ichiro Nagata Photo

Load Comments