History Channel’s ‘Lock n’ Load’ with R. Lee Ermey Premiering This Month

New York, July 2009— History comes to life as R.…

New York, July 2009— History comes to life as R. Lee “Gunny” Ermey leads viewers on a fascinating ride through the engineering and development of weapons in the new one-hour series, LOCK N’ LOAD With R. Lee Ermey , premiering Friday, July 31 at 9pm ET on HISTORY.

Get hands-on with some of the world’s fiercest firearms— such as machine guns, tanks, pistols and rockets— as Gunnery Sergeant, drill instructor, Vietnam veteran, actor and former MAIL CALL host R. Lee Ermey demonstrates the weapons that made battlefield history. For example, Ermey unleashes a torrent of ammo using a Dillon Aero Minigun, which shoots three thousand rounds per minute, and then traces the evolutionary steps that brought the gun to its present place in history.

Learn the inner workings of a particular weapon in each episode of LOCK N’ LOAD With R. Lee Ermey as special high-speed photography gives viewers an unprecedented look at how weapons work and what really happens at the point of impact. Advanced 3D graphics help to detail the improvements, changes in technology and thinking behind each weapon, while experts flesh out the engineering and history involved.

It’s an enthralling ride through the evolution, origins, innovations, victories and defeats of weapons, as Ermey delivers the story with, literally, one finger on the trigger.

LOCK N’ LOAD With R. Lee Ermey is produced for HISTORY by Beyond Entertainment. Mary Donahue is Executive Producer for HISTORY. Executive Producer for Beyond Entertainment is John Luscombe, Co-Executive Producer is John Tessier.

Load Comments
  • Dear Gunny;
    I am retired from the United States Army, and upon my induction into the services I attended several schools prior to me being assigned to a TO&E unit. I was trained to work on all of the trucks, light and heavy,wrecker vehicles of all sizes.
    I repairded tanks from 25 tons up to the m60 and tank retrivers from the M74 up to the m88. my assignment also allowed me to repair all of the Armored personnel carriers that were in the inventory up to 1967.I remember in 1955 I use to work on a Armored Personnel Carrier that was called a M75 that had a radial engine installed that was easy to remove and install. If you can find some history on this vehicle, many of us from back in the day, certainly would appreciate your concern. Thank you.
    (Ret SFC) Leodis Youngblood

  • Dear Gunny;
    I am retired from the United States Army, and upon my induction into the services I attended several schools prior to me being assigned to a TO&E unit. I was trainee to work on all of the trucks, light and heavy,wrecker vehicles of all sizes.
    I repairded tanks from 25 tons up to the m60 and tank retrivers from the M74 up to the m88. my assignment also allowed me to repair all of the Armored personnel carriers that were in the inventory up to 1967.I remember in 1955 I use to work on a Armored Personnel Carrier that was called a M75 that had a radial engine installed that was easy to remove and install. If you can find some history on this vehicle, many of us bach in the day certainly would appreciate you concern. Thank you.
    (Ret SFC) Leodis Youngblood

  • Phil Patton

    Gunny,
    About the way you hold a rifle when you shoot. My father also a Marine taught me to put my left arm through the sling an push it away from my body, like a wing. The CBs also shot this way.
    When I see you shoot you have your left arm in front of your chest.
    Could you do a show on the proper way to shoot both a rifle and pistol?

  • Richard Landgraff

    Another episode I have to pan (due to showing the same opening clips all over again at each commercial break) is on pistols.

    It was very well done except they totally by-passed the most influential pistol of all time, namely the German Luger.

    It was derived by a German gunmaker, Hugo Borschadt, who was working for Smith and Wesson at the time. S&W didn’t want to produce it (it was rather ugly though the toggle bolt was interesting) so he went back to Germany and has his friend Georg Luger produce some.

    They worked the size down and cleaned up the design to come out with the 1902 Luger in a bottle-neck cartridge of 7.65mm. In 1908 they took the bottlenect out to make the 9mm Parabellum (military like) cartridge. This cartridge was used in over 100 variations of the Luger and was quickly adapted by Browning for semi-auto pistols and by the British for their Sten gun.

    It probably can’t be counted on how many pistols and sub-machineguns have been designed for the 9mm Parabellum now known as the 9mm NATO standard pistol and SMG cartridge — 101 years after it’s first introduction.

  • Richard Landgraff

    I have already left a posting on tanks where the show skipped over the entire series of Patton tanks of post WW II and the M-41 Walker that today is still a mainstay tank in many foreign countries.

    The show on machineguns was very interesting, except for the Thompson SMG. It’s too bad that even the owner doesn’t know how to shoot one to write letters on sheet metal plates.

    The M1921 was difficult as it fired too fast at about 1000rpm. The M1928A1 had a buffer installed to slow it down to 550-600 rpm. FBI demonstrations were shown on the old “You Asked For It” TV show hosted by Art Baker (in the 50’s).

    Trick: You do NOT try to hold the barrel down. Your reflexes are not fast enough. With the reduced rpm all you need to do is open up your hand under the foregrip and let the barrel bounce back down into it.

    Too bad they didn’t research this better.

  • Dear Gunny:I was watching your show on artillary last night. Those civil war reenactors were using a friction primer, where can I purchase those that were used on the show ? I have a 23inch cannon with a 1 inch bore. Just looking for a fuse alternative. My video is shown on youtube, search for “the ghetto blaster cannon “. and enjoy.

    Sgt (ret) Greg Alberts

  • dear gunny,I am a formerE-7 force recon exo.I caught the first episode of your new show.It was ok for the novice,but what have you got for us old pros? one of my favorite weapons is the barrett 106 all777 grains of the ammo I USE in my personal weopen.Just imagine what carlos hathcock could have done if this weopen would have been avaible in the nam.Iknow you are a busy man,but is there any way you can show this awsome weopen. YOU CAN EVEN USE MINE.KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK,SEMPER FI.CARL TANK PRUITT USMC RET.

  • Donald Mathis

    Sorry, I sent a e-mail to you gunny. About, the howitzer. I left out something. It was the name of the piece i wished you would have talked about. That piece would be the M110 Howitzer or the 8 inch Howitzer. Sorry for the mistake.

  • Donald Mathis

    I seen your field artillery show the other night. Like always very informational about the history of the cannon. Although, i, wish you would have said something about one very important cannon. It would have been the biggest self-propel howitzer. It was the frist piece i was trained on. Everybody wants to talk about the 109 howitzer.It was the second piece i was trained own. Love the show gunny. Thanks for all you do. E-4 Donald Mathis