Military fighter drone crashes near Roswell, New Mexico.

Lt. Col. George Biondi, Director of Operations for the 82nd…

Lt. Col. George Biondi, Director of Operations for the 82nd Aerial Targets Squadron, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, flies this QF-4 “Rhino” as a safety chase on the wing of a remote-controlled unmanned QF-4 “Rhino” full-scale aerial target drone after a Combat Archer Air-to-Air Weapons System Evaluation Program mission over the Gulf of Mexico. The QF-4 Phantom II, affectionately known as the “Rhino”, is used as a threat-representative unmanned target for live-fire test and evaluation missions. It maintains the basic flight envelope capabilities of the original F-4, and can also be flown manned for workup and remote controller training missions. United States Air Force QF-4’s are flown by the 82nd Aerial Targets Squadron from Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida and Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico. (U.S. Air Force photo Tech. Sgt. Michael Ammons) (Released)

Military officials say a military fighter drone has crashed near Roswell.

Roswell fire officials say they were told one person was on board the jet.

Holloman Air Force Base spokesman Tom Fuller says the QF-4 jet went down Wednesday morning but he was unable to immediately release any other details.

KOB-TV reports there is live ammunition aboard the plane, and rescue crews were being asked to approach the crash site with caution.

The QF-4 drone is used as a target for weapons testing. It can be flown by remote control or with a pilot.

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Lt. Col. George Biondi, Director of Operations for the 82nd Aerial Targets Squadron, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, breaks to the right in this QF-4 “Rhino” after chasing a remote-controlled unmanned QF-4 full-scale aerial target drone for landing during a Combat Archer Air-to-Air Weapons System Evaluation Program mission over the Gulf of Mexico. The QF-4 Phantom II, affectionately known as the “Rhino”, is used as a threat-representative unmanned target for live-fire test and evaluation missions. It maintains the basic flight envelope capabilities of the original F-4, and can also be flown manned for workup and remote controller training missions. United States Air Force QF-4’s are flown by the 82nd Aerial Targets Squadron from Tyndall Air ForceBase, Florida and Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico. (U.S. Air Force photo Tech. Sgt. Michael Ammons) (Released)

Source: The Associated Press

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