Operation Homefront Preparing To Assist Military Post-Afghanistan

The U.S. military mission is changing, and Operation Homefront is…

The U.S. military mission is changing, and Operation Homefront is changing to prepare itself to best serve military service members and their families now and beyond the drawdown of U.S. forces in Afghanistan. As part of its strategic planning process, the organization is undertaking a change to its operating organizational structure.

Operation Homefront provides emergency financial and other assistance to the families of service members and wounded warriors. Assistance is in the form of grants to meet the most basic of needs like rent, utilities, food and housing.

Since its inception 10 years ago, Operation Homefront has had a national office and chartered Chapters around the country. Each Chapter is its own nonprofit with a Board of Directors and responsibility to fund itself locally, while delivering a host of programs and services under an agreement with the national organization. Each Chapter handles its own governance, fundraising, accounting, legal registrations, web site maintenance and a myriad other administrative and management responsibilities. The National organization provides national partnership, standards and procedures, donated in-kind goods, common infrastructure systems, and other types of resources and assistance to Chapters.

“Like our military, Operation Homefront has been asking questions like ‘How will our mission need to change?’ and ‘Where will the needs be?’ and ‘What resources will we have and how should those resources be best employed to help the most families?'” said Jim Knotts, Operation Homefront’s president and chief operating officer. “These are complicated questions, but it would be irresponsible not to take an active approach to making the changes necessary to continue supporting our service members. One thing is certain – Operation Homefront will continue to serve our military service members and their families, now and after the deployments to combat zones end.”

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