Top Shotguns 2014 SPECIAL WEAPONS FOR MILITARY & POLICE lead
Top Shotguns in 2014 From SPECIAL WEAPONS FOR MILITARY & POLICE

Top Shotguns in 2014 From SPECIAL WEAPONS FOR MILITARY & POLICE

A roundup of today’s top shotguns — some of the most exciting and innovative tactical smoothbores available on the market!

While rifles and carbines are seemingly the new normal in tactical long arm circles, the shotgun still has a great deal going for it. With its undeniable close-range power and fight-stopping performance, today’s tactical shotgun is a great partner to have with you when the chips are down.

While capacity may be low compared to a rifle, the sheer adaptability of the shotgun is an undeniable advantage. With the ability to (in many cases) fire a variety of munitions ranging from buckshot to slugs to specialty loads (including bean bags and tear gas), the modern scattergun is ready for just about any mission.

Following is a round up of some of today’s most exciting and interesting tactical shotgun offerings. From modern semi-automatic variants to battle-proven slide action models to Kalashnikov-based versions to upgrade kits, there is something out there on the market for just about anyone. If you need to bring the impressive power of the shotgun to the fight, this is where you need to look.

Read on to learn more about which of these top shotguns may be right for you.

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  • Faraday Defcon

    If you want to die in a firefight, buy the UTAS. Nobody has been able to fire more than three rounds with it without jamming. It’s TERRIBLE. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brQi_T5RTAk

  • Jim_in_Houston

    I have one of these. In addition to its tactical use, I got my first turkey with it last April. I have had several problems with mine, which was an early version. It is very sensitive to ammunition. Only US manufactured – Federal, Remington, and Winchester – is extracted reliably. I sent it back to the factory for an $80 (plus shipping) upgrade to the version 2, which beefs up some of the composite parts by replacing them with metal (the top rail, for one). Then at a tactical shotgun course, the lower receiver had several parts come loose or break and the laser / light stopped working. Back to the manufacturer at their expense for replacement of the broken parts and the laser / light. I have not had it out for a test drive yet; however, there is a ways to go before I can consider it reliable enough for my primary home defense weapon. UTAS has been extremely responsive to my problems, so I can’t fault them there.