Up to 100 U.S. special forces help in hunt for warlord Kony.

U.S. Army special forces Captain Gregory, 29, from Texas, center,…

U.S. Army special forces Captain Gregory, 29, from Texas, center, who would only give his first name in accordance with special forces security guidelines, speaks with troops from the Central African Republic and Uganda, in Obo, Central African Republic, Sunday, April 29, 2012, where they are searching for infamous warlord Joseph Kony. Obo was the first place in the Central African Republic that Joseph Kony’s Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) attacked in 2008 and today it’s one of four forward operating locations where U.S. special forces have paired up with local troops and Ugandan soldiers to seek out Kony and hope he will stand trial at the International Criminal Court for war crimes and crimes against humanity after his forces cut a wide and bloody swath across several central African nations. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Obo was the first place in the Central African Republic that Kony’s Lord’s Resistance Army attacked in 2008; today, it’s one of four forward operating locations where U.S. special forces have paired up with local troops and Ugandan soldiers to seek out Kony, who is believed likely to be hiding out in the rugged terrain northwest of the town. For seven years he has been wanted by the International Criminal Court for war crimes and crimes against humanity after his forces cut a wide and bloody swath across several central African nations with rapes, abductions and killings.

Part of the LRA’s success in eluding government forces has been its ability to slip back and forth over the porous borders of the Central African Republic, South Sudan and Congo. But since late last year, U.S. forces have been providing intelligence, looking at patterns of movement, and setting up better communications to link the countries’ forces together so that they can better track the guerrilla force.

Sent by President Barack Obama at the end of 2011, the 100 U.S. soldiers are split up about 15 to 30 per base, bringing in American technology and experience to assist local forces.

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  • Christ Burke

    Kony isn’t fighting muslims, he’s committing genocide in an effort to “purify” the Acholi people. He’s also been ordering the abduction of children to become child-sex slaves and child soldiers. This has been going on for almost two decades. There are two reasons we’re caring now which is information pointing to suspected LRA/al-qaeda pact unraveled and the securing of our investments. In 2000, Uganda qualified for enhanced Highly Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) debt relief worth $1.3 billion and Paris Club debt relief worth $145 million. That’s taxpayers’ money

  • Kurmudjin

    Exactly so, Mr. Mullins. I’ve read elsewhere that no one is even sure if Kony is alive; no sightings in last 2 years. Absolute waste of Taxpayer $$, people, & their time.

  • Jim Mullin

    What’s Kony doing? Fighting muslims? If he is,the 100 US soldiers should help him out.Of course,they shouldn’t be there in the first place.If they want to save someone,let them go save christians in “muslim” dominated lands.Why? Because for the most part christians are easy pickings for muslims ( whose religion says it’s GOOD to kill other people )and most of the US armed forces are baptised christians ( maybe not “practicing” but baptised ).It’s wrong for warriors to help a sworn enemy to kill the warriors’ own people, or natural allies,only to have to face that sworn enemy on a future battlefield.Kony? If he’s fighting muslims,give him more ammo.