OPTIMUM TAC SCOPES

Without proper glass, even the most high-end precision rifle is a worthless club in combat!

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U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Tim R. Lee, with Scout Sniper Platoon, Headquarters and Support Company, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), fine tunes the sights of his M-40 sniper rifle before the first stage of a three-day platoon competition in Djibouti March 25, 2010. The contest challenges scout snipers in communication, marksmanship and teamwork during competitive relays. The 24th MEU is on a seven-month deployment aboard Nassau Amphibious Ready Group vessels as the theater reserve force for Central Command. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Alex C. Sauceda/Released)

With the popularity of tactical precision rifle shooting on the increase, it naturally follows that new participants want to get the most from their choices. While rifle selection is without a doubt a top priority, choosing a tactical scope is nearly as important. In fact, it’s so important that it literally controls how effective both the rifle and its operator will be.

When the newcomer first peruses the mind-boggling array of tactical scopes currently available, he more often than not finds himself, “on the horns of a dilemma.” Small wonder — there are so many different types and designs being offered these days. So many, in fact, that even the more experienced tactical precision rifle shooter can find himself confused as to which one is best for his needs.
After spending a sizeable chunk of money on a factory or custom-made rifle, the shooter also crashes into the fact that any tactical scope worth having isn’t going to be cheap. Thus, he needs to resign himself to spending a bit more to get the best scope he possibly can.

What To Look For
This is not to say that the most expensive scopes are necessarily the best, however. Some of the most costly scopes are designed for highly specialized missions and, as such, aren’t the best for general-purpose use. Better to first do some serious cogitation on what you want from the rifle/scope — define your needs, as it were — before you lay down your hard-earned bucks. That way, you can narrow the field considerably and get the most for your money.