75th Ranger Regiment

The 75th Ranger Regiment is the U.S. Army’s premier special…

The 75th Ranger Regiment is the U.S. Army’s premier special operations light infantry rapid assault force. The Regiment operates under USASOC (U.S. Army Special Operations Command) at Ft. Bragg, NC, which is a subordinate command under SOCOM (U.S. Special Operations Command) based at MacDill AFB, Tampa, FL. The 3,000 soldiers assigned to the Regiment do not train foreign troops as do Special Forces; nor do they hand out school supplies to the indigenous populace as do Civil Affairs troops. The Rangers of the 75th have but one purpose in life: Close with and destroy the enemy…period.

The mission of the 75th Ranger Regiment is to plan and conduct joint special military operations in support of U.S. policy and objectives. Their capabilities include, but are not limited to: airfield seizure, air assault, direct-action raids, forced entry operations, seizing strategic key terrain and support of joint special operations and forces.

With its headquarters at Ft. Benning, GA the Regiment consists of four Ranger battalions positioned across CONUS. In addition to the regimental headquarters, the 3rd Ranger Battalion and Regimental Special Troops Battalion are also at Ft. Benning. The 1st Ranger Battalion is located at Hunter Army Airfield, GA, and the 2nd Ranger Battalion is stationed at Ft. Lewis, WA. Each of the battalions can be deployed anywhere in the world on 18 hours notice.

The newest Ranger battalion in the regiment is the RSTB (Regimental Special Troops Battalion) activated at Ft. Benning in July, 2006. The RSTB conducts communications, sustainment, intelligence, reconnaissance and maintenance missions in support of combat operations.

The 75th Ranger Regiment is an agile and lethal force equipped and trained to fight in any environment encompassing urban, jungle, desert, Arctic and mountain operations. The Rangers can conduct operations from squad to regimental size and are skilled in a variety of insertion and extraction techniques, e.g. parachuting, fast-roping, ground, and sea. When they are not deployed, the Rangers maintain their readiness to fight with continued training and live-fire exercises. Training is often conducted at night and during adverse weather conditions.

Ranger Training Brigade
Any male soldier—whether they are part of the 75th Ranger Regiment or another unit that volunteers for Ranger school at the Ranger Training Brigade—will undergo 61 days of muscle-burning physical and mental exertion. Trainees will carry between 65 to 90 pounds of combat gear and participate in more than 200 miles of tactical foot movement. Pushing themselves past exhaustion, they will survive on 2200 calories per day—that is one MRE—and if they are fortunate they will get between zero and five hours of sleep a night. Ranger training is not for the faint of heart, to say the least!

Phase I takes place at Camp Darby, Ft. Benning, GA and is designed to develop and assess the military skills, physical and mental endurance and confidence a soldier must possess in order to successfully negotiate and accomplish combat missions.

Phase II Mountain Phase is conducted at Camp Merrill, Dahlonega, GA. During this phase students receive instruction on military mountaineering tasks as well as techniques for employing a squad and platoon for continuous combat patrol operations in a mountainous environment.

Phase III is conducted at Camp James E. Rudder, Eglin Air Force Base, FL. Training develops the students’ ability to plan for and lead small units on independent and coordinated airborne, air assault, small boat, and dismounted combat patrol operations in a low-intensity combat environment against a well-trained, experienced enemy.

At the end of this phase is a 10-day FTX (field training exercise). This comprises a fast-paced, highly stressful, challenging exercise in which the students are evaluated on their ability to apply small-unit tactics and techniques. They apply the tactics/techniques of raids, ambushes, movement to contact, and urban assaults to accomplish their missions. Upon successful completion of Ranger training the student is awarded the coveted Ranger tab.

Worth noting is that the Ranger school is an Army leadership school, and thus under the Training and Doctrine command. The 75th Ranger Regiment is exclusively an Army special operations element under the Special Operations Command.

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  • DSumner

    One quick note, junior enlisted soldiers no longer attend RIP. They now attened a course called Ranger Assessment and Selection Program (RASP) I. It’s an eight week course split into two phases. This is what the Army has to say about RASP I.

    “For Junior enlisted soldiers, they will attend an eight week program upon the completion of Basic Training, Advanced Individual Training, and Airborne School. The Ranger Assessment and Selection Program junior enlisted Soldiers attend is separated into two phases. The first phase is four weeks long and assesses the candidate’s physical fitness, mental toughness, and mental aptitude while training the soldier on Ranger Combat Skills. The second phase is more specialized and trains the candidate on advanced marksmanship techniques, advanced demolitions and breaching, and combat driving skills. Upon Graduation of RASP I these Rangers are assigned to one of the four Ranger Battalions.”

    NCO’s Attend RASP II

    “For Non-Commissioned Officers and Officers, they attend a three-week program of instruction, which tests their physical fitness, mental aptitude, mental toughness, and leadership abilities. The program trains these candidates on Special Operations skills in order to prepare them for service within the Ranger Regiment.

    Upon graduation of these two programs, these Rangers are assigned to one of the four Ranger Battalions. Although the U.S. Army Ranger School is not directly affiliated with the 75th Ranger Regiment, most Rangers will attend Ranger School within their first two years in the Ranger Regiment.”