California criminal database poorly maintained.

The information tells police and potential employers of a person's…

The information tells police and potential employers of a person’s past offenses, but nearly half the arrest records don’t say if a conviction ensued. State workers chase paper records trying to fill gaps.

The criminal records system California relies on to stop child abusers from working at schools and violent felons from buying guns is so poorly maintained that it routinely fails to alert officials to a subject’s full criminal history.

The computerized log exists to provide an instant snapshot of a criminal past, informing police, regulators and potential employers of offenses such as murder, rape and drug dealing in a person’s background. But nearly half of the arrest records in the database don’t say whether the person in question was convicted.

Source: Jack Dolan for The Los Angeles Times.

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  • John

    Can anything else really be expected of the ‘granola’ state?