Concealed Carry

California gun owners press the case for hidden weapons.

Image: gunholsters.com Chuck Michel’s strategy for crime-fighting rests on the…

Image: gunholsters.com

Chuck Michel’s strategy for crime-fighting rests on the element of surprise: Keep the bad guys guessing who’s armed and who’s not.

“If 5 percent of the ducks could shoot back, you’re not going to go duck hunting,” said the Long Beach lawyer representing many Californians denied concealed weapons permits and, in his view, their constitutional right to self-defense.

For decades, that argument has fallen flat in the courtroom. Judges have routinely held that denying permits to carry loaded firearms in public does not infringe on gun owners’ right to keep and bear arms.

But now, some gun owners hope that courts will soon reverse course and find that they have a right to secretly tote their weapons in public. Ironically, their optimism stems from a piece of gun control legislation that took effect last month and bans them from openly carrying even unloaded handguns.

Courts have upheld local law enforcement officials’ authority to deny concealed weapons permits in part because “you had the opportunity to openly carry an unloaded weapon and in the event of an emergency you can quickly load and defend yourself,” said Adam Winkler, a UCLA law professor and author of “Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America.” “Now that option has been taken off the table.”

Source: Read the rest of Carol J. Williams’ article at the Los Angeles Times via Morris Daily Herald.

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  • Matt in Oklahoma

    Kalifornia