Editorial: CALIFORNIA, THY NAME IS HYPOCRISY

From the State of fruits and nuts, you know, the…

california-thy-name-is-hypocrisyb

From the State of fruits and nuts, you know, the bankrupt one precariously perched along the San Andreas Fault, the one that has outlawed legal ownership of .50 BMG rifles, the one that has outlawed legal ownership of a whole class of ill-and-malapropos-defined “assault” [sic] weapons, comes the pin-headed move that really pulls the rag off the bush.

Various groups of elected officials there have decided they are going to boycott Arizona, because Arizona has passed a law that states if an individual’s presence in this country is illegal according to Federal law, then it is also against Arizona law. Hmmm, I wonder if the California boycott also includes the electricity California buys from Arizona? Nobody ever accused the politicos in California of being great Constitutional scholars, but we wonder if anybody there bothered to check what the U.S. Constitution has to say about free trade among the several states, and taxing or restraining—or in this case outright boycotting—such trade.

A fair guess would be that they never bothered to check, as they do not appear to be very good at reading laws, not the Supreme Law of the Land… nor even their own penal code.

California already has a law on the books, more stringent than the one Arizona just passed, that spells out what all California LEOs—no matter from what jurisdiction—are required to do when they arrest an illegal alien. And it has legal consequences for those officials and/or jurisdictions that do not comply.

It does not say such illegals will be issued a California driver’s license: It says they will be turned over to federal authorities, after the State of California has finished their business with the individual. Nor does it say that flaky individual jurisdictions can opt-out of the law and declare themselves “amnesty” cities: It says this is the law, and everybody has to comply with it alike. Gee, what a novel concept!

We couldn’t make up this sort of political comedy, but so you will know we didn’t, below are the texts of the pre-existing California law, and the newer Arizona law. Read them both, and then you decide who’re the knuckleheads here. For all the reading on the topic you want, since you will NOT get it from the network news or large city papers, go on-line and Google “California Penal Code.”

Inspired by Arizona’s new law, legislators in nearly a dozen states are considering new laws they hope will be effective against illegal immigration—and it may be good politics to do so: A new USA Today/Gallup poll shows that 9 out of 10 Americans say it is at least moderately important for the federal government to act this year to secure the borders and stop illegal immigration. Just more than 60 percent say they are very concerned undocumented workers are putting an unfair burden on U.S. schools, hospitals, and social services.

The Arizona measure directs police to question lawful residency only after individuals have been stopped on reasonable suspicion of having violated another law. It directs police to verify residency if suspects are unable to produce documentation. Why is this an outrage? And if their presence in this country is in itself illegal, why shouldn’t our laws apply to them? They apply to you and me, Joe.

Steven A. Camarota, research director for the nonprofit Center for Immigration Studies, noted to Newsmax that requiring identification after a traffic violation is just common sense: without proper identification, a citation is virtually unenforceable, he noted.

For California and Arizona penal code citations click to the next page.

Load Comments
  • in the long run you gotta do what’s best for yourself…

  • CW

    “The fury over Arizona law is that police are able to stop anyone for LOOKING like they’re illegal. Furthermore, Arizona police have the ability to detain American citizens for not having the paperwork to prove that they are legal citizens.”

    Did you bother to read the actual AZ law? Because your comment I quoted above make it appear that you haven’t.

  • JM

    This is extremely misleading. Nobody is debating what happens when they find an illegal alien.

    The fury over Arizona law is that police are able to stop anyone for LOOKING like they’re illegal. Furthermore, Arizona police have the ability to detain American citizens for not having the paperwork to prove that they are legal citizens.

    This article only states that it’s illegal to be an illegal alien, and nobody is questioning that.