Goddard’s Vietnam-era, 227-mission F-100D jet heads to the Museum of Aviation.

Rick Goddard waits for his wife Judy to join him…

Rick Goddard waits for his wife Judy to join him at the cockpit of the F-100 Super Sabre he flew in 180 missions over Southeast Asia at the Museum of Aviation in Warner Robins Monday. The aircraft was most recently on static display at Otis Air Force Base Massachusetts. Once restored, the aircraft will become the first thing visitors to a planned Southeast Asia display in Hangar One at the museum will see when they walk in the front door. Image: GRANT BLANKENSHIP/THE TELEGRAPH

An F-100D fighter once flown by retired Air Force Major General Rick Goddard during the Vietnam War is coming home to the Museum of Aviation. As a young fighter pilot, Goddard flew 226 combat missions in F-100s, 180 of them in this exact aircraft (#56-2995) from September 1968 to October 1969 while assigned to the 309th Tactical Fighter Squadron in Vietnam. The aircraft was eventually retired from active service in 1978 and put on display at Otis AFB, Massachusetts. The aircraft is being trucked to the Georgia Museum and is expected to arrive on Monday, December 13.

“I was very surprised that the aircraft was still around,” said Goddard, who was the Commander of the Warner Robins Air Logistics Center at Robins Air Force Base from November 1997 to February 2000. “I found out about it from a web site contact and notified the Museum of Aviation.” Museum Director Ken Emery contacted the Massachusetts base and negotiated a deal to trade the plane for another less significant F-100 in the Museum’s collection.

The F-100 coming to the Museum was built by North American Aviation in Inglewood, California in 1957 and ironically came first to Robins AFB for modifications before being assigned to an operational flying unit. During its 21 years of flight history, it was assigned to units in England, North Africa, Germany, Italy and Arizona before going into combat in Vietnam in 1968. From 1971 to 1978 it flew its final missions with the Massachusetts Air National Guard.

Source: The Warner Robins Patriot

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