Lockheed Martin will display their Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, or JLTV, at the U.S. Army Strong Zone outside the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.

Lockheed to Display Joint Light Tactical Vehicle in Texas

Lockheed Martin will display their Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, or JLTV, at the U.S. Army Strong Zone outside the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.

Lockheed Martin will display their Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, or JLTV, at the U.S. Army Strong Zone outside the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas on Saturday. The proposed vehicle would replace the Humvee as the standard vehicle of the U.S. Army and Marine Corps.

Two separate models of the JLTV will be showcased at the U.S. Army Strong Zone, which is a 129,000 square foot interactive display area featuring some of the Army’s most elite technology and assets. The event is part of the U.S. Army All-American Bowl at the Alamodome.

Lockheed is one of nine bidders competing for a Defense Department contract to be awarded in 2015. The DoD will order 55,000 vehicles to replace its Humvees. AM General and Oshkosh are some of the other companies vying for the contract.

The JLTV is almost 18 feet long and nearly eight feed wide, with a curb weight of 14,000 pounds. It tops out at over 70 mph.

Read more: http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local/military/article/Fortified-tactical-vehicle-offered-to-replace-5109387.php

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  • greg summers

    Please look at the JLTV image. The angle under armour looks like it is revetted on. In a mine event the rivets break off and bounce around the inside like HMG bullets.

  • ddearborn

    Hmmm
    What ever happened to the notion of a light weight air droppable vehicle all around utility vehicle. The old m151A2 worked wonders in this regard. Hell if it got stuck 6 guys could pick up one end and put back on the road. And changing a tire was still first echelon maintenance. (the operator could fix it) The Humvee was a reasonable upgrade as long as you are operating in open terrain and city streets. Not so great in the hills and dense forests of Europe and much of rural America.
    These are light armored vehicles. While I am sure they would work well for their intended purpose I don’t see how an 18 foot long 8 foot wide 7 ton armored truck could possible replace the Humvee. Just think what these would be like operating on city streets. And anytime they need to be deployed it will take a massive logistical undertaking. We spent aat least 10 Billion on Humvees and upgrades in the last ten years alone. I am willing to bet that the total cost of this pig in poke will be closer to 30 billion. Good grief. But it will be a great way to put the fear of god in the locals as it rolls down main street USA…………

    • Ben Gordon

      The Jeep might as well be a tin can if it hits a mine or IED. The entire reason for this vehicle is to have a troop transport that won’t completely destroy every road it’s on, yet be able to fully protect it’s passengers from small arms and mines.