Minnesota governor vetoes ‘castle doctrine’ self-defense bill.

Image: thecastledoctrine.com The proposal, supported by the gun-rights groups and…

Image: thecastledoctrine.com

The proposal, supported by the gun-rights groups and opposed by Minnesota’s law-enforcement organizations, would have expanded the legal justification for citizens who use deadly force in threatening situations.

The bill, sponsored by Rep. Tony Cornish, R-Good Thunder, and Sen. Gretchen Hoffman, R-Vergas, was the top priority of the National Rifle Association and drew some DFL votes in addition to near-unanimous Republican support. The measure passed by votes of 40-23 in the Senate and 85-47 in the House.

It would have changed the legal definitions of self-defense for someone facing a serious threat in their homes, and would have expanded this “castle doctrine” to cars, motor homes, boats and even tents.

It would have done away with a person’s duty to retreat when facing a threat in public places, which supporters called the “stand your ground” concept. It would also have legalized concealed-weapons permits issued by all states, regardless of their standards in granting permits, and limited the situations in which police can temporarily remove weapons from homes in volatile situations.

Source: Jim Ragsdale for StarTribune.

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