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NSSF: Hunting More Affordable Than Most Think (CREDIT: NWTF)

NSSF: Hunting More Affordable Than Most Think

The National Shooting Sports Foundation recently released its report "Hunting in the 50 States," detailing regulations and more throughout the US.

The following is a release from the National Shooting Sports Foundation:

We’re sure you know that a day spent hunting beats a day in the office. What you might not know, though, is that a day spent hunting in many cases is more affordable than a day spent on the golf course or at a major league ballgame.

That’s something to keep in mind with National Hunting and Fishing Day coming up on Saturday, Sept. 27. Many opportunities nationwide are available to spend a day afield that weekend.

Statistics in NSSF’s latest report, “Hunting in the 50 States: Regulations, License Fees, Species and Methods of Take,” clearly show that you get more bang for your buck hunting than in other competing hobbies and activities.

“There’s a misperception about hunting being a very expensive pastime. It can be in some circumstances, but for the most part hunting compares very favorably with the costs of other popular activities like playing golf, attending professional sports games and even going to the movies,” said Jim Curcuruto, NSSF Director of Industry Research and Analysis.

The report, found here, estimates the average cost of a day of turkey hunting at $37.54 for license, tags and ammunition, placing it far lower than a round of golf, estimated at $72.54 for greens fees and a sleeve of balls, or a day at a major league ballpark, which will set you back $57.45 for a ticket, parking and a drink and a hotdog. While 10 days of hunting costs essentially the same as one day afield, taking in 10 movies at your neighborhood multiplex will add about $185 onto your credit card.

Of course, “Hunting in the 50 States” includes much more information than these comparisons — information that is valuable to manufacturers, retailers and shooting ranges.

To gain a better understanding of the expenses associated with hunting, NSSF combed through the regulation guides of all 50 states to produce “Hunting in the 50 States,” which consolidates data regarding big and small game, and provides both state-specific and national information.

The new report includes resident and non-resident license and tag costs, number of species available to hunt (more than 40 in some states), available hunting days and legal firearm use by state. The report’s pages contain interesting factoids on hunting — nine states, for example, allow the hunting of white-tailed deer with an air rifle — and there is an entire page on feral hog facts (population estimated at 5 million).

The report reveals how states provide many economic incentives to encourage hunting. Sportsmen and women in South Carolina, for example, enjoy two free days on which they can hunt without purchasing a state hunting license. In many states, licenses for apprentice hunters, juniors, seniors, military and the disabled are modestly priced, including for non-residents.

“Hunting in the 50 States” is available to NSSF members at nssf.org/research under the Industry Intelligence Reports tab. Non-members can contact jcurcuruto@nssf.org for additional information.

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