Some of the nation’s 200 F-22 Raptor pilots want to be moved into other jobs because of in-cockpit oxygen-deficit problems.

A Lockheed Martin F-22A Raptor fighter streaks by the ramp…

A Lockheed Martin F-22A Raptor fighter streaks by the ramp at the 2008 Joint Services Open House (JSOH) airshow at Andrews AFB. Despite many great performances most of those at the show wanted to see the latest USAF fighter. Rob Shenk/Wiki

Gen. Mike Hostage, commander of Air Combat Command at Langley Air Force Base in Hampton, Va., told reporters that a “very small” number of pilots have asked not to fly the fifth-generation fighter jets or to be reassigned.

“I’m going to check out and fly the airplane so I can understand exactly what it is they’re dealing with. The day we figure out what the problem is I will stop flying (the plane) because we don’t have enough sorties for all of our combat aviators to get as much training as they need,” he said.

The nation’s F-22 fighter jets were grounded for four months last year after pilots complained of experiencing a lack of oxygen that can cause dizziness and blackouts. Air Force officials said they have taken steps against the problem, but still haven’t pinpointed what’s causing the hypoxia-like symptoms. Hypoxia is when the body doesn’t receive enough oxygen.

Source: CBS News

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