Supreme Court has rejected an appeal over a federal law banning felons from having bulletproof vests or body armor.

The Supreme Court has rejected an appeal over a federal…

The Supreme Court has rejected an appeal over a federal law banning felons from having bulletproof vests or body armor.

The 7-2 decision on Monday not to intervene was a reaffirmation of congressional authority over a wide range of commerce.
The order was one of several hundred pending appeals the court summarily disposed of by the court.

By refusing to accept the case for review, the justices let stand the conviction of Cedrick Alderman, a Washington state man who was stopped by police in 2005 on suspicion of selling cocaine. Officers then discovered he was wearing a bulletproof vest. That in itself did not violate state law, but because Alderman was an ex-felon — convicted of armed robbery in 1999 — and the vest was manufactured in California, he was convicted under federal law. He was sentenced to 18 months in federal prison.

Congress had passed the law in 2002 in response to a series of high-profile shootings involving police, including bank robbers wearing body armor.

Source: Bill Mears for CNN.

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