Troopers ID emergency response team sniper who ended five-hour standoff crisis in Waterloo, Indiana.

Indiana State Police on Monday released the name of the…

Indiana State Police on Monday released the name of the trooper who shot and killed a man last month during a DeKalb County standoff – a confrontation that remains under investigation, according to a spokesman for the Fort Wayne post.

Trooper Brian W. Dunkin, who was appointed to the state police in December 2007, fired the sole shot that struck and killed Wayne King, according to the statement.

King, 38, had shot his estranged wife and held her at bay inside her Waterloo home on March 26, police said. The former Butler resident was shot after a 5 1/2 -hour standoff at 4155 U.S 6, just east of Waterloo.

He had held Dawn King, 40, inside her home after shooting her in the legs. When King refused to exit the home or let the woman leave, a standoff ensued, state police spokesman Sgt. Rod Russell previously said.

Members of the Indiana State Police Emergency Response Team, including Dunkin, were called to the scene. Troopers negotiated with King, who continued to be uncooperative and even fired several rounds at police with what is believed to be a 12-gauge shotgun. Trooper Dunkin, the sniper, fired a single shot into the house, killing the gunman, police said.

Dawn King was taken to a Fort Wayne hospital for treatment of severe injuries.

King’s death was ruled a homicide after an autopsy. He died of a single gunshot wound to the head, DeKalb County Coroner Jeff Warner said. Toxicology tests are pending to determine whether King was under the influence of drugs or alcohol the day of the standoff.

Police said the standoff was the culmination of ongoing domestic disputes between the couple, who had planned to get a divorce. King violated a protective order his wife had against him on the day of the standoff, police said.

Dunkin has never been the subject of any internal investigation. He also has had no disciplinary action taken against him during his tenure, according to a statement released by state police in response to a Freedom of Information Act letter filed by The Journal Gazette.

Dunkin originally worked at the state police’s Bloomington post and was reassigned in October 2008 to the Operations Support Division and the North Squad of the Emergency Response Team, the statement said.

Dunkin attended Emergency Response Team training school and has received ongoing training in that area. In addition, Dunkin attended sniper observer school in August, the statement said. He is also a certified defensive tactics instructor.

Sgt. Ron Galaviz, a spokesman for the state police, said Monday the investigation into the Waterloo shooting is ongoing.

The findings of the internal investigation will be handed over to the DeKalb County prosecutor for review.

The investigation is expected to be completed this week or next, Galaviz said. The prosecutor will then review the case to determine whether the shooting was justified.

Meanwhile, state police are also investigating a threat against Dunkin that was sent to a general e-mail address at the post the day after the shooting.

Galaviz said police are working to identify who sent the e-mail – which could result in an intimidation charge.

Intimidation is a felony, punishable by up to three years in prison and $10,000 in fines.

Source: Holly Abrams for The Journal Gazette

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