http://outdoorgroupstore.com/ Wyoming Law Enforcement Adds MRAP Armored Vehicle to Arsenal
Three counties and a police department in Wyoming added a massive MRAP armored vehicle to their arsenal.
Three counties and a police department in Wyoming added a massive MRAP armored vehicle to their arsenal.

Wyoming Law Enforcement Adds MRAP Armored Vehicle to Arsenal

Three counties and a police department in Wyoming added a massive MRAP armored vehicle to their arsenal.

Three counties and a police department in Wyoming added a massive armored vehicle to their arsenal. Washakie County Sheriff Steve Rakness announced the acquisition of the MRAP (Mine Resistant Ambush Protected) armored vehicle through surplus inventory at no public cost.

The vehicle will be available in emergency situations to Washakie, Big Horn and Hot Springs counties and the Worland Police Department.

The MRAP vehicle weighs just under 14 tons. It is armored for all IED (Improvised Explosive Device) and small arms fire and ambushes. It can attain speeds of 70 miles per hour and carry up to eight people.

Read more at http://www.dailyjournal.net/view/story/8daa7f83ac7145e0b3cdd2f0dc9dddf6/WY–Armored-Acquisition

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  • Herbert_Philbrick

    How long before they get tired of driving that POS in the Fourth of July parade and begin to look for REAL uses… like collecting overdue parking tickets, or busting farmers for selling raw milk.

  • Ruger454

    This is preposterous. Washakie County has a population of 8,300 (which includes the metropolis of Worland with a population of 5,300), Big Horn County has a population of 11,500, and Hot Springs County has a population under 5,000. What in the world do the law enforcement agencies in such rural areas propose to do with an MRAP?
    Practicality is a real problem here. These are big counties. Presumably the MRAP will be headquartered in Worland. If there is some kind of emergency (try to imagine an emergency in say Wolf, Wyoming to which an armored vehicle is the solution), it would take most of a day for an MRAP to get there. (Top speed may be 70 mph, but you don’t drive an MRAP at top speed for hours on end.) By that time the emergency is already going to be reported on the Internet in the past tense.
    Cost is another problem. MRAPs are expensive to maintain, and it might require a tax increase for those three rural counties to afford to keep it in tactical condition. I am sure that the ranchers and residents of Washakie, Big Horn, and Hot Springs Counties are eager to pay more taxes so that they enjoy the occasional intimidation factor of an armored vehicle.
    I predict that taxes will be raised, the MRAP will be a show piece but rarely if ever used for its intended purpose, and they’ll get rid of it. But the tax rates won’t go down. That never happens. One might regard this as nothing other than a cunning technique to raise taxes.

    • Chris Brown

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montana_Freemen

      http://www.cnn.com/US/9603/montana_freemen/28/index.html It would seem that even rural areas can use a armored vehicle do deal with WACO Whako types. All it takes is one bullet to kill you and if you can have shelter in a MRAP to achieve this then I am all for it. These MRAP’s are Police Action vehicles not battle tanks.

      • invisible empire

        I love the smell of roasting pigs

      • garyspencer

        Where in the world did you ever get the idea that this vehicle will be used as “shelter” for the citizenry? I hope you are violently victimized by the users of this vehicle.