LOCK-SOLID MANIX2 | Folding Knife Review

Spyderco’s Eric Glesser downsizes his original beast and creates a “never-fail” workhorse of a folding knife.

Rugged and reliable, the ball-lock equipped Manix2 is offered in multiple edge patterns that will please most any user.

Spyderco of Golden, Colorado, is at the top of any savvy knifeperson’s short list for overall production knife quality and design excellence. Over the years they have redefined the term “tactical folder” multiple times. Additionally, Spyderco has legitimized numerous and varied patterns from a diverse group of outside designers and has left an indelible mark on the knife world as a whole. In my opinion, Spyderco’s most talented pod of designers is their father and son team of founder Sal and wunderkid Eric Glesser. Looking back at Spyderco’s best models over the last 2 decades, certain things jump out at me—their inhouse designs are consistently the most practical and the most innovative all at once.

About 7 to 8 years ago Spyderco started refocusing on some “heavy format” folders: some using mid-locks, some using their tough compression lock, and a select few using their newest innovation, the ball lock. I am a big fan of alternate-locking mechanisms and by alternative I mean anything other than a liner/frame lock. I don’t want to voice my disdain for the many knives on the market that seem to have locking mechanisms that seem to have been designed as an afterthought, but let’s just say that with Spyderco knives, lock strength is paramount. I have never seen one fail.

lock-solid-manix2-bThe thin edge of the Manix2 zips through flesh like a razor through butter. The 154-CM steel never chipped or rolled at all, even when working around bone.

The original Manix was an Eric Glesser design that I immediately fell in love with. A wide, broad blade, full-size grip, and hell-for-stout mid-lock folder added up to one massive working tool. It did everything I need in a working folder; problem was it was too big for most people’s tastes and not practical for everyday carry. A smaller version ensued but it was a bit thick and heavy for its size. Always tweaking in true Spyderco fashion, Eric devised the Manix2—a knife that retained the best qualities of the XL Manix with a few departures to set it apart. Once I saw the prototype, I was hooked.

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