PSK In A Wallet!

ESEE’s new Izula Gear Mini Survival Kit is perfect for…

ESEE’s new Izula Gear Mini Survival Kit is perfect for anyone, but it has real appeal for combat soldiers, DEA officers and anyone who might be taken prisoner.

If you carry a wallet, you’re carrying a survival kit. The tools of survival in that wallet are those we most need to get along in civilization; no human, aboriginal or modern, ever willingly went naked into the wilderness. The skin bag tied at the waist of a loincloth became a leather possibles bag in the muzzleloading era, and that has evolved into the wallets and handbags of today. As it has always been, there are many things in modern society that simply cannot be done unless a person is armed with the proper tools. ESEE Knives elevates the wallet survival kit to a new level with their Wallet E&E/Mini Survival Kit. More than a wallet filled with survival tools, this outfit should have instant appeal to combat soldiers, DEA agents or anyone interested in survival, evasion, resistance and escape tactics. Made in the U.S.A., the kit begins with a heavy-denier black nylon tri-fold wallet bearing the Izula Gear ant logo.

Nylon piping is stitched around each edge, inside and out, and corners are thermally sealed against fraying. ESEE’s jungle-savvy designers understand that a survival kit must be functional and convenient enough to carry at all times, and it has to withstand long periods of disuse without losing any of that functionality. This ruggedly built tri-fold can function as an everyday wallet, it can be carried on a belt or strap by the belt on the wallet’s back, or it can be secured with a small carabiner or dog hook through the unused grommet. Unfold the Mini Survival Kit and it becomes a POW’s dream.

The first indication that this unit is more than a simple survival kit is a non-metallic polymer handcuff key—small enough to swallow—that won’t set off metal detectors. Contained with it in a small, heavy-mil Ziploc bag is a super-tough, non-magnetic titanium scraper blade with two holes that enable it to be lashed to a handle. There is also a tiny, two-part cylindrical survival compass whose red-painted end swings toward magnetic north when hung from a string, even when rolled across a smooth (non-ferric) surface.

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