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When Eugene Stoner designed and built his lightweight .223 Automatic Rifle (AR), few thought that it would eventually become one of the most successful weapon systems. At first, the AR’s future was in doubt due to the poor performance of early M16s, its small, lightweight bullet and the military’s resistance to a weapon made of aluminum and plastic (as opposed to wood and steel). Now the AR is on its second generation of users and its future looks bright.

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Why? Thanks to foresight and engineering, the AR can be readily adapted and customized, and nearly every AR part has been refined and improved through decades of combat experience. One of the most popular (and effective) upgrades is having a safety level on both sides of the receiver, which makes the safety easy to manipulate with either hand. And now that same ambidextrous operation is available for the bolt carrier during reloading. Teal Blue Bravo’s PDQ Ambi-Bolt release enables the shooter to hold open the bolt carrier and then release it without taking the hand off the handgrip or the weapon off the shoulder. When your AR runs dry and the bolt carrier locks back, a right-hand reload sequence generally goes like this:

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1. Use your trigger finger to release the magazine while taking your hand off the handguard to capture the empty magazine and/or retrieve a fresh magazine;

2. Insert the fresh magazine then take your eye off target to find and release the left-side bolt-catch release;

3. Re-grasp the handguard and re-acquire the target; and

4. Re-engage the target.

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With the PDQ, your reload sequence is better:

1. Use your trigger finger to release the magazine while taking your hand off the handguard to capture the empty magazine and/or retrieve fresh magazine;

2. With your eyes on target, insert a fresh magazine and re-grasp the handguard while using your trigger finger to nudge the right-side bolt-catch release located just above the magazine release button; and

3. Re-engage the target.

The PDQ costs $59.95 and can be installed on any AR, M4 or M16 rifle by either the manufacturer or the customer. For DIY’ers, use the supplied illustrated and diagrammed instructions along with a vise, Dremel Moto-tool and file to modify your own lower receiver and create a fully ambi AR! The PDQ is made in the U.S., of military-grade steel that is hardened and mil-spec-coated to match any AR. For more information, visit tealbluebravollc.com or call 386-530-0078.

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