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Based on sniper operations in both Iraq and Afghanistan, the U.S. Army recognized that its excellent 7.62mm NATO M24 could be improved, so it ordered a new weapon from Remington first called the “XM2010” and now just the “M2010.” At first, only 250 were delivered, but they became hugely popular with the snipers that used them in Afghanistan. Based on the results and feedback from troops, the Army decided to replace its entire fleet of M24s, ordering a total of 2,558 M2010 rifles.

“We were honored to be there when the last M2010, serial number RR99823C, was completed at the ISO-certified Remington Defense production area…”

The Remington M2010 is chambered in .300 Winchester Magnum for an extended effective range out to 1,200 meters—50 percent farther than the effective range of the M24—while maintaining 1-MOA accuracy. The rifle’s bolt action utilizes a detachable five-round magazine for easier reloading. For greater modularity, the M2010 features the Remington Arms Chassis System (RACS) which includes a side-folding buttstock that is adjustable for length of pull and cheek height. It also is equipped with a monolithic top rail for mounting a Leupold 6.5-20x50mm long-range optic while still providing plenty of room for adding other devices. The RACS forend features an integral cable management system that helps users place any rail-based accessory wherever they desire.

Each M2010 is shipped with an Advanced Armament Corporation (AAC) TiTAN-QD sound suppressor and a soft carrying case within a hard-sided case for transport and storage.

We were honored to be there when the last M2010, serial number RR99823C, was completed at the ISO-certified Remington Defense production area on April 25, 2014. During the event, Remington displayed its entire lineage of sniper rifles, including the modified M1903A4 rifle; the M24 used by the Army, Air Force and USSOCOM for the last 25 years; the USMC’s M40; the M24A2, which many Army units procured by upgrading their M24s using their own unit funds over the last 10 years; the M2010, Special Operations Command’s new Precision Sniper Rifle (PSR); and Remington’s new Concealable Sniper Rifle (CSR), which can be rapidly disassembled and stored in a backpack or suitcase.

U.S. Army snipers, some of the most successful warriors America has, celebrate the end of production of the M2010 rifle.
U.S. Army snipers, some of the most successful warriors America has, celebrate the end of production of the M2010 rifle.

The event was celebrated by a visit from a group of seasoned U.S. Army snipers, some who had actually used the M2010 in action overseas, including one of the largest and most costliest engagements, Operation Anaconda in Afghanistan, when a Chinook helicopter was shot down resulting in the deaths of 25 American special operations personnel. During the subsequent recovery efforts, several teams of army snipers provided overwatch of the still-contested battlespace. The sniper teams were deployed at different locations, distances and elevations for the purpose of interlocking fire that completely covered the desired terrain.

The aggressive actions by the experienced snipers ensured that the enemy forces were kept busy with them—not the troops trying to extract the warriors and sensitive gear from those lost in the battle. Over several days, U.S. Army snipers engaged and eliminated dozens of Taliban fighters, sometimes firing “ridge to ridge” using their long-range weapons. Most of the snipers used rifles manufactured by Remington, including the newest addition to their arsenal, the M2010 sniper rifle.

Each sniper hand-tightened the finishing screws alongside the Remington team responsible for the M2010’s design and production as well as the government program managers and engineers from PM Soldier Weapons at Picatinny Arsenal—all of whom contributed to this huge success story for Remington, the U.S. Army and, most importantly, the snipers in the field.

For more on the M2010 as well as the brand-new CSR from Remington, check out the upcoming September 2014 issue of TACTICAL WEAPONS magazine, available on newsstands and digitally July 8, 2014. To subscribe, go to https://www.tactical-life.com/subscribe/tactical-weapons

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