Steyr Scout mag main lead
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The people who fear and want to ban detachable box magazines (DBMs) literally don’t understand why we need them. It’s not just about capacity or rapid reloading, it’s about changing the load we’re using when new conditions arise, and the concept has been around for nearly 100 years.

While the country’s politicians rush to ban “assault clips,” “war magazines” and whatever other misguided thing they want to call DBMs for ARs, M1As, AKs and other military-style rifles, the use of DBMs has exploded in bolt-action rifles and hunting-configuration semi-autos like the Benelli R1.

We decided to take a look at some of the box-fed rifles available to U.S. buyers.

 

ArmaLite AR-31

Unlike its predecessors, ArmaLite’s latest bolt action, the AR31, accepts all double-stack AR-10B magazines, so the 7.62mm NATO tack driver can be stoked with five-, 10-, 15- and 25-round magazines. The rifle comes with a 10-round magazines as well as a skeletonized buttstock adjustable for both length of pull and cheek height. The long top rail offers plenty of space for mounting optics, and the forend features smaller side rails for adding accessories. (armalite.com; 800-336-0184)

Specifications: ArmaLite AR-31
Caliber: 7.62mm NATO
Barrel: 24 inches
OA Length: 45.4-47.4 inches
Weight: 14.1 pounds (empty)
Stock: Skeletonized
Sights: None
Action: Bolt
Finish: Hardcoat anodized black
Capacity: 25+1
MSRP: $3,460

 

Barrett MRAD

The industry is full of DBM weapons, but one of the standouts is Barrett’s multi-caliber MRAD (Multi-Role Adaptive Design) rifle, which looks like an AR on steroids but is actually a bolt action that users can quickly change between 7.62mm NATO, .300 Winchester Magnum and .338 Lapua Magnum. (barrett.net; 615-896-2938)

Specifications: Barrett MRAD
Caliber: 7.62mm, .300 WM, .338 Lapua Magnum
Barrel: 20-26 inches
OA Length: 49 inches (26″ barrel)
Weight: 11.7 pounds (empty)
Stock: Skeletonized, folding
Sights: None
Action: Bolt
Finish: Cerakote
Capacity: 10+1
MSRP: $6,000

 

Benelli MR1

Benelli’s MR1 is the non-pistol-grip version of the company’s AR-magazine-compatible semi-auto. Lacking a pistol grip and threaded barrel, it makes a great choice for those who live in states with “assault weapons” bans. The MR1 has Benelli’s attractive Italian styling as well as a recoil-absorbing buttstock, a top rail for optics, a rear aperture sight, a protected front sight and an easy-to-use charging handle on the right side. The Benelli MR1 comes with a five-round detachable box magazine. (benelliusa.com; 800-264-4962)

Specifications: Benelli MR1
Caliber: 5.56mm NATO
Barrel: 16 inches
OA Length: 37.1 inches
Weight: 7.9 pounds (empty)
Stock: Synthetic
Sights: Front post, aperture rear
Action: Semi-auto
Finish: Matte black
Capacity: 5+1
MSRP: $1,429

 

CZ-USA 750 Sniper

The massive CZ-USA 750 Sniper rifle uses a proprietary 10-round magazine to dispense tactical justice out to 800 yards. The synthetic, thumbhole stock is adjustable for comb height and length of pull. The underside of the forend is fitted with a rail for mounting a bipod. The Sniper comes with a 26-inch, 1-in-12-inch-twist barrel with four-groove rifling and a muzzle brake, a thread protector, a mirage shield and two 10-round detachable magazines. (cz-usa.com; 800-955-4486)

Specifications: CZ-USA 750 Sniper
Caliber: 7.62mm NATO
Barrel: 26 inches
OA Length: 48 inches
Weight: 11.9 pounds (empty)
Stock: Synthetic
Sights: None
Action: Bolt
Finish: Blued
Capacity: 10+1
MSRP: $1,999

 

J. Allen JAE-700

There are also lots of new replacement stocks for bolt-action rifles that convert them to take detachable box magazines. Accuracy International, Ashbury Precision Ordnance, Eberlestock, J. Allen Enterprises, H-S Precision, and many others now offer chassis systems to allow the Remington 700 rifle, with a long or short action, Savage and other bolt actions to use AICS box magazines. J. Allen Enterprises’ JAE-700 is a state-of-the-art rifle chassis developed from the company’s M14 stock. The JAE- 700 starts with an MSRP of $899 for the basic stock, but it’s available with a laundry list of options, from quick-detach, thumbwheel-adjustable cheekrests to bottom and side Picatinny rails. Constructed with an aircraft-grade aluminum skeleton covered by a thin polymer skin, the JAE-700 will convert your long- or short-action 700 into a modern tack driver that accepts AI magazines. (jallenenterprises.com)

Specifications: J. Allen JAE-700
Caliber: 7.62mm NATO
Barrel: 24 inches
OA Length: 43.4 inches
Weight: 7.3 pounds (empty)
Stock: JAE-700
Sights: None
Action: Bolt
Finish: SWAT black
Capacity: 10+1
MSRP: Starting at $899 for basic JAE chassis

 

Mossberg MVP Patrol

A bolt-action rifle platform that takes standard AR magazines! Why did this idea take so long to surface? My 5.56mm MVP Varmint, with a 24-inch barrel and a gray laminate stock, proves very stable and deadly accurate at the range—1 MOA at 100 yards shooting Federal American Eagle 55-grain 5.56mm FMJs. Moving farther out, the long-barreled MVP makes consistent hits at 200 and 300 yards. Mossberg’s MVPs now come in several chamberings, including 7.62mm/.308 and .204 Ruger, and variants include the shorter-barreled Predator, the FLEX with an AR-style collapsible stock, an official OD-green-stocked Thunder Ranch version and a Patrol model with iron sights, a matte black stock and a threaded barrel. The MVP Patrol also comes with a fiber-optic front sight for fast targeting and an adjustable rear aperture sight just forward of the optics rail. Mossberg also offers a version of the Patrol with a 3-9x32mm scope. (mossberg.com; 800-363-3555)

Specifications: Mossberg MVP Patrol
Caliber: 5.56mm NATO
Barrel: 16.25 inches
OA Length: 36.25 inches
Weight: 7 pounds (empty)
Stock: Black/textured
Sights: Adjustable
Action: Bolt
Finish: Matte blued
Capacity: 10+1
MSRP: $709

 

Ruger Gunsite Scout

Based on the proven M77 Hawkeye action, the Ruger Gunsite Scout is a 16.5-inch-barreled bolt action in 7.62mm NATO with a three-position safety, a stainless steel bolt, a barrel-mounted scope rail, iron sights and a Mini-14-style flash suppressor. With a gray laminate stock, a rubber recoil pad and spacers to adjust the length of pull, the Scout is a compact, quick-handing brush gun. Ruger ships the gun with one 10-round magazine. Although Ruger sells these magazines in three-, five-and 10-round capacities on shopruger.com, they are the same pattern as AICS magazines. The Ruger versions sell for less than AI-marked magazines. With a street price in most gun stores under $1,000, the Ruger Gunsite Scout is a bargain for the quality, accuracy and reliability you’ll get. (ruger.com)

Specifications: Ruger Gunsite Scout
Caliber: 7.62mm NATO
Barrel: 16.5 inches
OA Length: 38-39.5 inches
Weight: 7.1 pounds (empty)
Stock: Laminate
Sights: Front post, adjustable rear
Action: Bolt
Finish: Stainless
Capacity: 10+1
MSRP: $1,039

 

Steyr Scout

The late Colonel Jeff Cooper, the founder of Gunsite Academy, wanted one “general-purpose rifle suitable for taking targets of up to 880 pounds at ranges to the limit of 300 meters” with a long-eye-relief scope mounted low and forward, ahead of the action opening. The ideal scout rifle would also have a detachable box magazine, a built-in bipod and be capable of shooting into 2 MOA or less at 200 yards. In 1997, after nearly seven years of direct development between Cooper and Steyr engineers, the first “Jeff Cooper” model Scout rifle hit the gun stores. The rifle featured all of Cooper’s requirements, and was chambered for the 5.56mm NATO, 7.62mm NATO and .376 Steyr. While Cooper purists would insist on at least a 7.62mm chambering, my favorite version is the 5.56mm “Mannlicher Scout.” (steyrarms.com; 205-417-8644)

Specifications: Steyr Scout
Caliber: 5.56mm NATO
Barrel: 19 inches
OA Length: 38.6 inches
Weight: 6.6 pounds (empty)
Stock: Synthetic
Sights: None
Action: Bolt
Finish: Black or stainless
Capacity: 5+5+1
MSRP: $1,799

 

Volquartsen Evolution

Available in both .223 Remington and .204 Ruger, the Evolution is a gas-operated semi-auto built on Volquartsen’s own CNC-machined stainless steel receiver with an integral Picatinny rail and a 20-inch, match-quality, 1-in-9-inch-twist barrel. My Evolution prefers mil-spec aluminum mags to the new polymer ones, and topped with Leupold’s 3-9x40mm VX-R Patrol scope, the Evolution is a real beast with 55-grain .223 Remington ammo, popping empty shotgun shells at 50 meters. Not inexpensive at an MSRP of $2,700 with its distinct I-fluted barrel, carbon-fiber-style stock and forward-blow compensator, the Evolution is alone in its firearms class. It’s a true match-grade, 5.56mm semi-auto that will gladly feed from STANAG magazines. (volquartsen.com; 712-792-4238)

Specifications: Volquartsen Evolution
Caliber: .204 Ruger, .223 Rem
Barrel: 20 inches
OA Length: 39.4 inches
Weight: 11.63 pounds (empty)
Stock: Laminate
Sights: None
Action: Semi-auto
Finish: Stainless
Capacity: 10+1
MSRP: $2,198

 

Wolf VEPR 12

Wolf VEPR 12 mag lead
Wolf VEPR 12

The VEPR 12 is the newest AK-based shotgun that utilizes detachable box magazines, joining the likes of the earlier Saiga platform. Built in the same MOLOT factory that makes the Russian military RPK, the VEPR 12 (available from Wolf Performance Arms) has got a heavier-duty receiver and fires 12-gauge ammo from a five- or 25-round box magazine. Also note the VEPR 12’s folding, skeletonized stock with a polymer cheekrest as well as the grooved pistol grip. The VEPR 12 has AK-style sights as well as a Picatinny top rail. (wolf-arms.com; 888-757-9653)

Specifications: Wolf VEPR 12
Gauge: 12; 3-inch chamber
Barrel: 19 inches
OA Length: 42.4 inches
Weight: 9.5 pounds (empty)
Stock: Folding, skeletonized
Sights: Front post, adjustable rear
Action: Semi-auto
Finish: Matte black
Capacity: 5+1
MSRP: $799

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